Q & A with May 6 Mind and Supermind Presenter, Expert Mindfulness Coach Dave Mochel, on Unconditional Wellbeing – How Living Mindfully Can Save the World

Local author, internationally known mindfulness coach, Dave Mochel, to share daily practices that change lives, relationships, and cultures, May 6, 7:30 pm

The human brain is complicated. We are wired to seek comfort and pleasure, and to seek meaning and purpose. Sometimes these impulses compete and sometimes they are complementary. Which impulses we choose to nurture has enormous implications for our individual well-being and the survival of the planet.

Acclaimed mindfulness coach and author Dave Mochel

Join entertaining TEDx presenter Dave Mochel, internationally known mindfulness coach, and unpack the meaning of the unconditional well-being – health and happiness that is independent of your circumstances – and how to practice it in your daily life, Monday May 6, SBCC School of Extended Learning Spring Mind and Supermind Lecture.

Dave Mochel, founder of Applied Attention Coaching and Consulting, teaches proven practices for converting stress, anxiety, resistance, frustration, and distraction into fulfillment, growth, and connection. He helped start an international leadership academy that serves students from more than sixty countries. Dave also consults locally, serving organizations and companies like Cottage Health, Towbes Group, The Knox School of Santa Barbara, Crane School and the Santa Barbara and Goleta public schools. He serves as a lecturer in the School of Health and Human Performance at Stanford University.

Dave answered a few questions to about what to expect during his entertaining, inspiring and hands-on presentation as  SBCC School of Extended Learning’s Spring Mind and Supermind Lecture Monday, May 6 at 7:30 p.m., Schott Campus Auditorium, Schott Auditorium, 10 W Padre St., Santa Barbara, CA 93105.

What is unique about your approach to mindfulness coaching?

DM: Our society encourages us to seek comfort and pleasure — whatever it is that will make us feel better. In modern culture, mindfulness is being marketed and co-opted as another way to escape – a way to feel comfortable. Anyone who has tried sitting quietly for any length of time knows that it’s not necessarily comfortable. You feel things.

The original intent of mindfulness was to build our capacity to be with whatever we’re feeling – not an approach to escape or suppress difficult feelings. We’re not designed to feel good all the time. When we try, we often avoid things that are important. We turn away from people who are struggling or suffering. The idea of seeking comfort and pleasure to be happy is not a sustainable approach to life. For example, for pleasure’s sake, we might only eat sweets. It’s just not good for our health to pursue pleasure obsessively. Fulfillment comes from connecting with others and acting in accordance with values and commitments — whether we feel like it or not.

I’m trying to help people get back to that original intent. If you are trying to use mindfulness to control your circumstances and to be comfortable — that is a conditional state. Unconditional well-being is the practice of working peacefully with what is outside your control and powerfully with what is within your control. We will look at the fundamental skills of unconditional well-being and how to practice them in daily life. You can work to attain what is important and not exclusively what is comfortable. Mindfulness builds skills of being with life as it is.

What are the big ideas you hope people will take away from your Mind and Supermind presentation?

DM: Ironically, with the huge interest in mindfulness and the demand to integrate mindfulness into education and the workplace, I actually want people to know it’s just not a big deal to bring it into your life.

I am hoping attendees on May 6 will come to understand that mindfulness is a skill-building practice. It can be integrated into your daily life like brushing your teeth. Mindfulness is being ‘sold’ as a feel-good product, as if you’ll be walking around with dreamy eyes and a goofy grin – but instead of spending our efforts trying to eliminate discomfort, we can practice accepting feelings for what they are, identifying what matters, making small daily choices, accepting responsibility for our choices, and learning from the consequences.

Is there something people can do right now to start on the path to unconditional well-being?

DM: Yes, there is something you can do right now – something that’s just about as easy as breathing! Stand in upright posture, feel your feet on the ground, and take a moment to feel your breath in your body for a couple of breaths – just a few times a day – that would make a difference. Try it, and join me on May 6 and share your experience.

Click here to register now for Mind and Supermind. Then try one of Dave’s two-minute meditations at  https://www.appliedattention.com/meditations/.

“The evidence from scientific research, lasting wisdom, and personal reflection is that the good life is a practice,” said Mochel. “It is the practice of working peacefully with what is outside your control and powerfully with what is within your control.”

Dave Mochel, founder of AppliedAttention.com, teaches proven practices for converting

stress, anxiety, resistance, frustration, and distraction into fulfillment, growth, and connection. Mochel coached new and established leaders, including championship athletes, health care professionals, educators, and entertainers. He helped start an international leadership academy that serves students from more than sixty countries. His local consulting clients include Cottage Health, Towbes Group, Knox School for Gifted Children, Crane School and Santa Barbara and Goleta public schools. Mochel serves as a lecturer in the School of Health and Human Performance at Stanford University.  

Mochel draws on his experience as a two-time cancer survivor, and more than thirty years of studying and teaching the practices and principles of mindfulness, well-being, and leadership. View Mochel’s popular TedX talk, What Are You Practicing Right Now?

WHAT: SBCC School of Extended Learning Mind and Supermind lecture, “Unconditional Wellbeing – How Living Mindfully Can Save the World”

WHEN:            Monday, May 6, 2019, 7:30pm – 9:30pm

WHERE:         Schott Auditorium, 10 W Padre St., Santa Barbara, CA 93105

ADMISSION: $20

EVENT INFO:   (805) 687-0812

Please register here.

Course number: 22430

“For more than thirty-five years, the Mind and Supermind series connects our community with top minds and dynamic speakers, like Dave Mochel, around cutting-edge topics of human psychology and global consequence,” said Andy Harper, SBCC School of Extended Learning Senior Director.

Dr. Spence Sherman will be the evening’s moderator.

About Dave Mochel

As the foremost expert in the practice of mindful self-regulation, Dave Mochel illuminates the incredible human capacity for unconditional well-being – the ability to thrive and grow independent of circumstances. Moreover, he shows how we can leverage this capacity with simple daily practices that foster peaceful and powerful lives, relationships, and cultures. Mochel draws on his experience as a two-time cancer survivor, and more than thirty years of studying and teaching the practices and principles of mindfulness, well-being, and leadership.

As the founder and CEO of Applied Attention Coaching and Consulting, Dave works internationally with individuals, teams, and leaders to help them focus their attention and energy where it will make the greatest positive difference. He combines modern science, enduring wisdom, and practical application in a way that is engaging, interactive, and transformative.

Dave has degrees in biology and geology from Williams College, a Master’s in Humanistic and Multicultural Education from SUNY New Paltz, and a clinical internship in Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center. He is also the father of two adult boys.

About the SBCC School of Extended Learning

The School of Extended Learning responds to the diverse learning needs of the adult population in the Santa Barbara community by advancing career and life skills, and building bridges to credit. www.sbcc.edu/ExtendedLearning.

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